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Entries in Strategy (11)

Tuesday
Feb042014

Strategy vs Tactics: Slow Route to Victory or Noise Before Defeat?

On a hot summer day on June 30, 1963, a Union cavalry officer named John Buford happened to ride through a town in Pennsylvania called Gettysburg with his cavalry of 2500 men. One of his soldiers came running to him and reported the strangest thing. The soldier thought he had caught the glimpse of someone in gray uniform: A confederate soldier! If there was a confederate soldier in a town in the Union territory, it could mean only one thing: He was not alone. And it made no sense for a small team of confederate army to be inside an enemy territory. There must have been more, many, many more. “Something is about to happen,” thought Buford, “something big.” 

Image: Monument on Cemetery Ridge overlooking battle site at Gettysburg National Military Park. How well does your business utilize the intellect of its people? Click on the image to take Business Health Check, AQ.He looked around the little town and did something that almost certainly decided the outcome of the battle of Gettysburg three days later. After sending off a soldier to inform the higher ranks of what was to come and get reinforcement, he directed his remaining men to occupy the tallest hills he could find in the town - including the now-famous Cemetery Hill - that were connected by a ridge, forming a high ground. 

Thousands of soldiers gave their lives in the fierce battle that ensued in the next 3 days, many of them defending Cemetery Hill and other high points in the battle and many more trying to take them. It was an uphill battle for the Confederate Army, quite literally, as it was much harder for them to attack a heavily defended row of hills that had a much better vantage point, not just of the attacking soldiers but also of the entire battleground. 

It’s said that everything that you do before the engagement begins in a battle is called “strategy” and what happens after the engagement is called “tactics.” Both strategy and tactics were important in the great battle of Gettysburg. Both sides had the talent, the courage and the resources to fight a good battle. (It could be argued that the Confederate side had better leadership as both of their top generals, Robert E. Lee and James Longstreet, were present on the battlefield.) But because it captured the high ground early, the Union army ended up with a strategic advantage that tipped the scale in their favor, resulting in a decisive victory for the Union and a devastating defeat for the Confederates. 
Note: The above account is largely based on the book “Killer Angels” by Michael Shaara and my own visits to the battleground, which happens to be an hour’s drive from my home in Maryland. Although the book was based on actual events, some of the factual details are hotly debated by historians. I don’t claim to be an expert on the subject, only a curious student. 
Both strategy and tactics are necessary to win a battle. By capturing the high ground early, John Buford gave the Union army an enormous strategic advantage. However, the Union army wouldn’t have been able to hold the Cemetery Hill without tactical, one-on-one engagement that often came down to hand-to-hand fighting.

Same is true for business. A business requires a unique combination of both strategy and tactics to be successful in the marketplace.

How Human Intelligence Relates to Strategy and Tactics

Both strategy and tactics require a level of thinking ability and intelligence. 

It’s been well-documented that our intellectual capacity has two aspects: One relates to the “left-hand side” of our brain and other relates to the “right-hand side” of the brain. The left brain helps us think in a logical, step-by-step fashion so that we can plan, forecast and manage things in a linear fashion to achieve a particular goal or objective. The right brain helps us think laterally so that we can consider multiple possibilities at once and create options to help accomplish our goals.

Another way to say this is that the left brain helps us think tactically and the right brain helps us think strategically. Of course, both are important in running a business. 

My experience in working with business leaders indicates that most businesses have an affinity to one aspect of the intellect while the other does not get as much attention. In other words, a business is either strategically dominant or tactically dominant. 

A tactically dominant business is efficient, disciplined and focused, which allows the business to take disciplined action towards a given goal. However, a tactically dominant business often behaves as if it has blinders on. It only sees what’s directly in front of it. It ignores what’s around it and what’s in its long-term interest. 

A strategically dominant business has big ideas and a panoramic, 360-degree vision that allows it to see many possibilities to achieving its goals and objectives. But it is not so good at putting those big ideas into action and making a positive, efficient forward movement towards its goals and objectives. It acts a bit like a “head-in-the-cloud” person who is good at dreaming up big things but is all over the place when it comes to execution.   

Being in either state causes many businesses to get stagnant, even after many years of success. What it often needs is to bring the missing dimension - either strategy or tactics - to its operations. A good business finds a way to bring these two faculties together in a way that’s meaningful to that particular business. 

In which category does your business fall: Is it strategically dominant or tactically dominant? What can you do to bring the other aspect of the intellect into your business? 

Perhaps a good place to start is to find how well your business leverages the intellectual capacity of your people, which can be done by taking Business Health Check, AQ

Copyright 2014 Bhavesh Naik. All rights reserved.

Bhavesh Naik is the Founder and Creative Director of Awayre, LLC, a management consulting and human resource development firm specializing in activating the hidden power of a business process by engaging its people’s awareness. Awayre, LLC is a pioneer in bringing human awareness to the field of management and human resource development as its structural and fundamental component.
Thursday
Nov142013

Are You Developing Your Service or Product in Vacuum?

It’s said that General Mills does not just manufacture cereal and then put it in a box. Their product teams first design the box and then bring in their manufacturing department to figure out what goes inside the box.

Please note: For the purpose of this article, I have used the terms “products” and “services” interchangeably with the assumption that all services could be defined as products and all products need to be seen as a service to the customer. 

One of the mistakes many businesses make is that they develop their services in a “vacuum” that is disconnected from the people who will benefit from them: their customers. As a result, they end up building the proverbial “mousetrap” with the possibility that the prospective clients may never come (or worse, it attracts lookie-loos and tire-kickers who are the wrong prospects for their product).

Perhaps a better way to view product development is as “concept” development. With concept development, a service or a product is built from the ground-up with the customer in mind. It integrates what the service exactly does for the customers, how it stands out as a unique solution to their problems and includes motivators that make them want to buy it. 
 
Think about your product or service, even if it’s something that’s not a prepackaged product like a box of cereal. How can you design your service as a concept? If it’s an existing service, how can you redesign it so that it’s not just a matter of pride in your business but also something that your potential clients will feel compelled to engage with?

A good way to look at a product concept is as a marketing message, which is often expressed as a Unique Selling Proposition (USP). What do you tell your potential clients about your products or services? Believe it or not, there is a formula for that. The best marketing messages have a few things in common.

First and foremost, a good marketing message clearly defines who your potential client is and how your product or service helps that person. This is true even if your business sells to other businesses. After all, businesses are made of people and your product or service will ultimately get used by people. A good message starts with WIIFM - “What’s In It For Me” - from your client’s standpoint.

Second, the message brings out and communicates - explicitly or implicitly - at least one thing about your service that sets it apart from other similar services being offered in your marketplace. This will eliminate those people who are not your prospects. But it will also attract and engage those prospects who truly are your prospects and will pay a little extra and try a little harder to do business with you.  

And third, it lays out the reasons why your prospects should believe your claim enough that they will take an action to engage with you in a meaningful way (click a button, request information or make a phone call, for example).

I have written a series of articles that goes in-depth into the mechanics of writing such a message. You can read them starting here. (They also include links to other related articles.)

I have also developed a template to help you develop just such a concept. You can download it here.

Copyright 2013 Bhavesh Naik. All rights reserved.

Bhavesh Naik is the Founder and Creative Director of Awayre, LLC, a management consulting and human resource development firm specializing in activating the hidden power of a business process by engaging its people’s awareness. Awayre, LLC is a pioneer in bringing human awareness to the field of management and human resource development as its structural and fundamental component.
Monday
Oct282013

Why Systems Don't Work in Selling

“A consistent thinker is a thoughtless person, because he conforms to a pattern and thinks in a groove.” ~ J. Krishnamurti
You’ve already heard the cliche’: People love to buy, but they hate being sold. It’s true.

One thing that exacerbates the problem of an already distrustful relationship between a buyer and a seller is the fact that many salespeople use step-by-step systems for selling. While such systems can help the salesperson, up to a point, they don’t help the buyer much. That’s why, most buyers see a system being used by the salesperson with a sense of trepidation and distrust.

I should know! Not only did I use a system for selling for more than 15 years, but I also taught one for five years. One that was designed, from the ground-up, to eliminate such mistrust between the buyer and the seller. 

The real problem with using a system in selling is that it views the buyer as a mechanistic entity that is predictable and controllable. If you have been in the selling field for a while, you will agree that nothing could be further from truth. Human beings are a dynamic entity that is hard to predict and control. That’s why, it’s only a matter of time before the system that sounded so great on paper falls apart in the real world. 

What’s needed instead is an “Un-system” that allows the salesperson to be in the moment while selling and responding appropriately to what the buyer does. This does not mean that you forget or unlearn what you already know about selling and selling systems. It simply means that you begin to graduate to a more advanced level of selling where you are not trapped into a system you know but transcend it and allow yourself to do what needs to be done in the moment of selling that’s best for both parties.

I have written a white-paper on this very subject which you can download here

If you want to find out how your Sales and Marketing department stacks against your business’ other functions - Operations and Customer Service, for example - take Awayre, LLC’s Business Health Check AQ (yes, it’s free). 

Copyright 2013 Bhavesh Naik. All rights reserved.

Bhavesh Naik is the Founder and Creative Director of Awayre, LLC, a management consulting and human resource development firm specializing in activating the hidden power of a business process by engaging its people’s awareness. Awayre, LLC is a pioneer in bringing human awareness to the field of management and human resource development as its structural and fundamental component.